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Posts from the ‘Living Benefits’ Category

6
Mar

The Healthcare Conversation You Need To Have Now

I came across this article in Forbes magazine and thought it was worth sharing.  This is relevant to anyone with aging parents – it puts protection in place for them and gives you peace of mind.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/ashleaebeling/2018/02/28/the-healthcare-conversation-you-need-to-have-now/#2a5d8a5d3a35

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20
Jan

The Importance of Critical Illness Insurance in Retirement Planning

There are a number of obstacles that could potentially de-rail a comfortable retirement. These include marriage breakdown, a stock market crash, and being sued. Another huge obstacle would be the diagnosis of a life threatening critical illness affecting you or your spouse. While it might be difficult to insulate yourself against some of the threats to retirement security, Critical Illness insurance goes a long way to mitigate the financial disaster that could result from a change in health as we approach retirement.

Considering that the wealth of many Canadians is comprised of the equity in their homes and the balance of their retirement plans, having to access funds to combat a dreaded illness could put their retirement objectives in jeopardy. Imagine that you are just a few years into or approaching retirement and you or your spouse suffers a stroke. The prognosis is for a long recovery and the cost associated with recovery and care is projected to be substantial. Statistics show that 62,000 Canadians suffer a stroke each year* with over 80% surviving* many of whom would require ongoing care. Since 80% of all strokes happen to Canadians over 60 those unlucky enough could definitely see their retirement funding jeopardized. Read more

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24
Oct

Boomer + Sandwich Generation + Club Sandwich + Boomerang = Financial Instability

The Sandwich Generation was a term coined by Dorothy Miller in 1981 to describe adult children who were “sandwiched” between their aging parents and their own maturing children.  There is even a term for those of us who are in our 50’s or 60’s with elderly parents, adult children and grandchildren – the Club Sandwich.   More recently, the Boomerang Generation (the estimated 29% of adults ranging in ages 25 to 34, who live with their parents), are adding to the financial pressures as Boomers head into retirement. It is estimated that by 2026, 1 in 5 Canadians will be older than 65. This means fewer adults to both fund and provide for elder care.  Today, it is likely that the average married couple will have more living parents than they do children.

What are the challenges? Read more »

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19
Oct

Juvenile Critical Illness with Return of Premium

Protection if you need it.  A refund if you don’t.

Critical Illness Insurance – Not Just for Adults

Most of us have experienced or known someone whose family has been greatly impacted by a parent being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease or condition.  But what about when it happens to children?  Sadly, all too often children are affected by childhood diseases such as:

  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Muscular dystrophy

Read more »

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17
Aug

Start a family conversation about elder care

BY David Wm. Brown and Sarah Brown

Starting a conversation about someone’s age is a sure way to be the least popular person in the room. But while this is a no-go territory for cocktail party chatter, it’s a conversation you need to have with your parents.

Statistics Canada tells us that in 2007, people aged 45 to 64 paid for 75% of elder care. And now, a new generation is realizing that when their parents need long-term care, they’ll be called upon to fund it.

Read more

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11
Jun

Workers unprepared for financial impact of disabilities

Most Canadian workers would suffer severe financial hardship if they were forced out of work with a disability.

In fact, 76% believe that should they become disabled and unable to work for three months, there would be serious financial implications for their family, such as significant debt or an impact on retirement plans, finds an RBC Insurance survey.

Despite the concern, only 27% have discussed how a disability would financially impact their family. This number does not increase substantially among workers who’ve indicated that they’ve taken time off in the past because of a disability (33%).

Read more

 

Used with permission from Benefits Canada Magazine
©iStockphoto.com
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